The three most read posts on Alen’s Think Place

The three most read articles at www.gojceta.com during the past year

After more than a year of posting to www.gojceta.com, it seems that the most popular articles were those written with intention to be posted to Alen’s Think Place. In competition with English translations of my articles published in Croatian business and technology magazines during the past decade, the winners were the two posts created out of pure intellectual joy, reflecting my thoughts, without expectation for a financial reward.

The most read article on www.gojceta.com was the story of my experience at the first McCafe’ in Zagreb: “A coffee shop in the hamburger kingdom“. It explored the business model and the McCafe’ service in general.

The other most read article, missing only one visit to equal the McCafe’s score was the story about brand extension of Cedevita multivitamin drink to their line of tea. “Dad does it dissolve in water?” was doomed to be written the day when my son confirmed to me that my own confusion with the brand message goes beyond my own perception.

The third most accessed article was “The bdp triangle – my framework to managing successful proactive telephone campaigns described in an article in Croatian business magazine Lider. Despite the fact that the “triangle” was around 10% behind the two winners, I’m very proud of this concept and I believe that it has deserved the position.

The most read articles at www.gojceta.com:

  1. A coffee shop in the hamburger kingdom
  2. Dad does it dissolve in water?
  3. The bdp triangle

The above articles are copyright of Alen Gojčeta

©2006-2010 Alen Gojčeta

About my Commentary Printed in Harvard Business Review Jan/Feb 2011

I had an honor to have the edited version of my comment to Harvard Business Review case study “Preserve the Luxury or Harvest the Brand?” printed in its January / February 2011 issue. Here is the case…

I had an honor to have the edited version of my commentary to Harvard Business Review case study Preserve the Luxury or Harvest the Brand? printed in its January / February 2011. The commentary was part of the gojceta.com initiative and it is embeded in my web 2.0 “personal strategy”, which is partly described in one of my posts.

Snapshot from the Jan/Feb 2011 HBR

I posted the comment to the hbr.org community in October 2010 after having read the intriguing case study. The complete text is available in the Jan/Feb 2011 issue of the Harvard Business Review, or on the HBR.org. In short, the case was about an imaginary French winery Chateau de Vallois. Vallois is a typical family business with simple business model combining vineyards cultivation with wine making. They are traditional in producing high quality wines and selling it through the traditional channel which exists for centuries in Boreaux. The negociants are wine merchants that diminish the risk of wine placement, but take the majority of the sales margins in return.

The youngest member of the family, after her MBA study and engagement with a leading consulting firm, wanted to make some change and start branding and selling wine on a much larger scale, targeting lower market segments. The young women’s idea engaged the family into discussion. Others were concerned about Vallois’s ability to market, their capacity to go for large scale, the relationship with negociants and similar.

The authors of the case study Daniela Beyersdorfer and Vincent Dessain wanted to hear opinions about going with a more affordable wine or stay with exclusivity.

This was my original commentary to HBR.ORG Vallois case study

Personally, I would’t go from exclusivity to wide market. We learned lessons from different industries such as car producers or fashion brands where this was often a bad idea.

I would rather use an even more exclusive wine*, sold directly from the chateau as brand exstension. Brand extension is fair even if adding several percent to profits of a business. Let’s say, in this case a new wine would make only 5% of the total quantity. Its margins would be double than the usual shipments due to direct sales and would add a 30% due to exclusivity. In this case the 5% of the revenue could contribute with additional 13% to the margin, assuming their selling price as base price and that the new production wouldn’t generate excessive additional cost (vine making is their core business anyway).

The new brand extension with exclusive price, channel and quantities would be a lever to increase demand for other wines purchased by negociants. The 5% of the total quantity wouldn’t create problems with the lack of grapes and would not harm the negociant’s market, but rather increase the whole brand value through scarcity of the newly introduced wine. The new wine would allow the owners to gain marketing expertise and establish the new business model with a low risk approach.

*In the original text it stands “vine” instead of “wine”

What was my point?

The approach I suggested was keeping the family business set up, while giving them the opportunity to start building their sales and marketing capability. The approach with even a more prestigious vine brand, sold directly from the vinery, would have been focused on profits rather than revenues.

How did I reach the above calculation?

Negiociants used to resell Chateau de Vallois’s wines with around 100% margin. If the Chateau would have had produced additional 5% of a more exclusive wine with higher margin of 7 value points from 5 quantity units, compared to the 135 value points they gain from 100 quantity units through negocitants (supposed cost ratio is 80 value points per quantity of 100 for both vines), it would contribute with 13% of additional profit margin (7 of 55).

New prestigious wine Actual wine
Quantity units 5 100
Production cost (value points) 4 80
Price sold out (value points) 12 135
End consumer price (value points) 12 200
Ch. de Vallois margin (value points) 7 55

What did I mean by lessons from different industries where brands have eroded due to switching from serving exclusive segments to wide markets?

Different exclusive car producers have given up their exclusivity to address a wider market. Not many of them have succeeded. Instead, many have struggled for years to regain the original brand proposition. Some of the examples were Porsche’s front engine GT models discontinued in 1995, or Jaguar’s trip into middle class car production.

Summary of the first year of Alen’s Think Place

The first full year of Alen’s Think Place is represented by 12 peaces of written work. Here are the summaries and links to 5 business articles translated to Englsih, 5 blog posts and 2 reviews of positioning / branding strategies…

The 2010 was the first full year of Alen’s Think Place is represented by 12 peaces of written work:

  • 5 translations of my articles published in Croatian business magazines during the past decade. Mostly on CRM.
  • 5 classical blog posts. Some of those were quick thoughts, and some other were excerpts from my recent articles
  • 2 reviews of positioning / branding approaches (McDonalds and Cedevita)

Alen’s think place is meant for business professionals, mostly for those who deal with sales, marketing, CRM and business strategies in general. I hope that you have found value for yourself and that you will keep finding it at www.gojceta.com.

CRM education – the follow up

11/23/2010
I used the www.gojceta.com to write the follow up of the CRM seminar I hosed. The conclusions are interesting to any professional dealing with CRM.

The CRM seminar redesign – the whys and hows

10/24/2010
In this post I announced the facelift of my CRM seminar and shared some thoughts about the approach.

The “bdp Triangle” – my Article on challenges of telesales campaigns – (English translation), Liderpress, 11/2005

09/09/2010
The “bdp Triangle” is among my best sales concepts….

Cedevita tea: “Dad does it dissolve in water?”

06/27/2010
I just couldn’t resist to write the article about this unconsistent branding approach…

Redefining the concept of Alen’s Think Place – the imperative of consistency

06/15/2010
A small “Alen’s ThinkPlace” strategy: consistent content to the consistent audience using a single language…

My Article on Organizational Gaps in CRM (translated to English), Banka magazine, March 2003

04/26/2010
The article elaborates the problem of a “CRM organization”…

Story about Mr. S and the failed CRM project

04/11/2010
Small insight in my latest article published in Mreza magazine through a story inspired by a true event…

7 wisdoms for a successful CRM implementation

03/16/2010
English preview of the implementation part of my April article – the 7 wisdom for a successful CRM implementation…

My Article on CRM customization (translated to English), Banka magazine, September 2002

01/31/2010
The concepts from this article from 2002 are just today becoming really mature and useable…

“Tasting” the McCafe’ business model

01/18/2010
In 2010 this was one of the most read articles at www.gojceta.com. Check why…

My article on IVR systems – PART 2 (translated to English), Banka magazine, May 2002

01/11/2010
A pretty long article about Interactive Voice Response set in two parts. Still relevant, but with the major change about the handy nature of mobile Internet access. Read first the part one below 🙂

My article on IVR systems – PART 1 (translated to English), Banka magazine, May 2002

01/02/2010
Part one of the above article.

All of the work above is copyright of Alen Gojceta. If you use it in academic or professional publications, please cite the author and the respective sources.

“Tasting” the McCafe’ business model

McDonalds announcement to introduce McCafe’ line of business brought many controversies during past year or so. One of the comments from a journalist was about hard-to-immagine truck diver who jumped in McDonalds for a fast and cheap hamburger lunch, asking a fancy cup of latte macchiato. Is this a problem? I went to the Zagreb McCafe and “had a taste” in person of the newly introduced McDonalds business model. Read about it in the furhter text and let me know what do you think.

A coffee shop in the hamburger kingdom

A year ago I read a lot about controversies about McDonalds’ decision to introduce coffee shops within their existing restaurants. At the time one of the many skeptics wrote that he couldn’t imagine a truck driver entering a McDonalds restaurant, taking a cheap lunch and ordering a fancy cup of coffee. There where many opinions that McDonald’s intrusion into Starbuck’s playground will turn into failure. There where many believing the opposite though.

Mc’Donalds decided for two approaches to introducing coffee line in its existing business:

1. In US the coffee line of business is integrated into the existing front counters

2. Separate counter and cafe’ – style furnishing within existing restaurants, started in Australia in 1993. This model started to extend to Europe in 2009.

In Zagreb the first McCafe’ was introduced in autumn 2009. I was really curious about what will be the success. These days I had the opportunity to “taste” the business model, through customer goggles. Here is my experience and annotations.

Me and my laptop walked through the McCafe’ door due to a reason different than usual choice of a cafe’. After the temporary suspension of the anti-smoking law in Croatia, McCafe’ remained one of the very rare places in Zagreb where one can enjoy a coffee without having to take the role of a secondary smoker.

Nice cakes, but where is the WiFi?

From customer perspective it was a decent experience (as I didn’t poor the coffee on my keyboard this time, my laptop will not be asked about his opinion :-)). The McCafe’ (at Zagreb at least) is smoothly integrated into the standard fast food area. As my idea was “work-and-coffee“, too many children running around after 3 PM where disturbing eventual phone calls. As some customers claimed to the Business Week’s reporter (http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/09_40/b4149070703260.htm?chan=globalbiz_europe+index+page_management+%2Bamp%3B+learning) in her article about McCafe’ penetration in Europe, the smell of French frites and hamburgers does spoil the coffee shop atmosphere. Indeed. During my stay at McCafe’ I really missed a WiFi link and a coffee sized less than a mid cup. What about a “small macchiato”?

When trying to have a look from the back door, my estimation is that the business model is placed on healthy basis. Here is why.

My only concern is that the McCafe’ bar seems often too empty, but the rest of business case seems to be built around productivity and up sell.

First, it is pretty hard to resist some of excellent, yet pretty expensive cakes, when you jump in for a cup of coffee.

Additional argument on up selling that keeps the business running, are many parents that approach the McCafe’ counter after having ordered food for their children at the fast food counters.

Productivity + up-sell is the name of the game

From productivity perspective, McCafe’ shares existing resources (such as cleaning personnel) with the rest of the restaurant and employs fewer personnel than an average coffee shop. Actually only one lady is taking care of the whole McCafe’ experience, including coffee making, cakes decorations, billing and the inevitable “enjoy” phrase.

Comparing with a traditional coffee shop that engages a “running waiter”, in McCafe’ the productivity is additionally enhanced by the fact that customers serve them selves at the bar and clean their desks afterwards by bringing their trays back to the McCafe’ counter. It is worth mentioning that the price of a small cup of coffee is among the highest in Zagreb area (10Kn = 1,3€, cca 2$). More expensive coffee can be found at a few very fancy places and 4+ star hotels.

Cakes to go

In terms of cross selling and reusing existing resources, McCafe’ has thought about the possibility to sell cakes “to go”, extending their presence to home parties and celebrations. McDonald’s has extended its business model to coffee line of business, without actually having to innovate, or spend too much. They got all of it already – food “to go”, restaurant management, location, experience management, standards,…

The Business Week’s article cited above, brought an estimation of Jeffrey Young, managing director of London management consultancy Allegra Strategies that the investment for a new stand alone Starbucks in Europe is at least tripple the amount of that for a McCafe’ within the existing McDonald’s facitilites. I’d add that it is the same ratio, if not higher, when talking about the daily business expences (personnel, energy and the like).

All in all it seems that there was no place for skeptics when talking about McDonalds introduction of McCafe’. The new line of business is all about up sell and reusing the existing resources. This was a simple business idea, and simply hard to miss. And here is a simple thought for the end: If these are results of a marriage between hamburgers and cappuccinos, think about the consequences of the merge between mobile (T-Mobile) and land line (T-Com) telecom operators.